More thoughts on cultural appropriation, humility and Vodou

An excellent commentary on cultural appropriation and voodoo.

The Hermit's Journey

I doubt that anyone not born or at least raised in Haiti from a young age can ever understand Vodou in its full depth; the development of Haitian Vodou is so rooted in the history and culture of that country. Those of us adopting the religion can learn as much as we can, but some nuances will be lost on us due to differences in language, concepts and environment. We will never be the ‘experts’ in the way that someone who has always lived in the tradition is.

I am not saying that outsiders cannot be called by the lwa. If I believed that, then this blog would not exist. But I do see the topic of cultural appropriation brought up a lot in the online places where I lurk. This is mostly a good thing, as all of us who are not Haitian need to keep this in mind…

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The Hekatean Prayer and Ritual Book: Call for Submissions

A call for submissions from all those people who work with Hekate.

Feral Druidry: The Crossroads Companion

Since doing Hoofprints in the Wildwood, I’ve been wanting to do a devotional for Hekate. However, there are so many Devotionals out there for her already most notably by Avalonia and B.A. So I’ve decided not to do a devotional proper, but rather a Hekatean Prayer and Ritual book, which I think there is much need for. This will be a book of prayers and rituals only, with images for meditational use. The idea being something you can take with you, read some prayers out of in either ritual or just thumb through reading prayers and looking at artwork on the fly for inspiration. The focus of this book is really prayer and ritual, so there will be no essays or poetry or the normal fare you would see in a standard devotional. I personally think something like this would be a boon to the community, not only to help new…

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Educate Yourself

The Crossroads Forest

There’s a real problem in modern Pagandom, and that’s the lack of self-education that goes on. No, I’m not talking about reading up on the latest in ancient history and archaeology, nor even doing in-depth studies of Pagan-esque literature, nor anything else you might think.

Let’s look at this in a different way.

Say you want to learn about gardening. You stumble across a book you really like by an author and find out that they have five other books on gardening, too. So you read those, too.

Do you know a lot about gardening or do you know a lot about one person’s views and experiences of gardening?

Hint: it’s the second one.

In gardening, if you really want to get into it, there are many things you can do to learn about gardening: you can read many books (by several authors, not just one like the above example)…

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Motivation Through Foveation

The Twisted Rope


A couple of months ago, I was filming a continuing education course for my company on endodontics, of all things. In this course, the speaker spent a lot of time talking about properly diagnosing x-rays, panorexes, and 3D renderings of teeth and all that. While going over this, he brought up the concept of foveation. For those of you who have never heard this term, wiki defines it as:

  1. (transitive) To angle one’s eyes such that the foveae are directed at (an object in one’s field of view), the fovea being the portion of the retina responsible for sharp central vision.

Which basically means that your eyes have a very small window where your vision is the sharpest, and it’s usually in the center of your vision. And while he was bringing up this subject in relation to quickly diagnosing x-rays properly, I could see the gods plastered…

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Craft Friday: Menat

An excellent do-it-yourself for anyone interested!

Upholding Ma'at

A menat is an interesting piece from Ancient Egypt. It was worn as a necklace (mainly as an amulet for protection) and was used as a percussion instrument. Contrary to how most people wear anything resembling a pendant, the menat was worn with the beads in the front (called the aegis, which means “shield”) and the pendant (called the counterpoise) was worn in the back. The menat was associated with a few goddesses, mostly Het-Hert. The menat was important enough of an instrument it was presented to Het-Hert as an offering.

While the strand length varied the menat consisted of three parts: the aegis (shield), which was usually a series of bead strands strung together and draped across the chest; the strand, though the length of this varied; and the counterpoise, which was large enough to serve as a handle for shaking the menat and as a counterweight for the…

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An Alternate View to Ma’at

The Twisted Rope

The more I dig into astral work, shadow work and crack in general, the more abstract my view on people (and all entities) becomes. My experiences have shown me that most, if not all of us have another “us” inside of ourselves. Sometimes this person looks just like us, sometimes they look entirely different. Sometimes we’re really good at hearing this person, other times we are completely oblivious.

But generally speaking, this part of us is usually a lot more well adjusted and big picture oriented than we are.

Some people might experience this part of themselves as a voice of reason in the back of their heads. Maybe some of us mistake our inner selves as the gods we worship (or perhaps the gods are screaming for our inner selves because we’re too deaf to hear our own voices). And in some cases, some people consider this inner portion…

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Kemeticism is like a Fandom

The Twisted Rope

Alternate title: A is for Aubs is a poopy-head.

This post was sparked by the Great Shopping Cart Debacle of 2013 and this post here.

For those who don’t know about the Great Shopping Cart Debacle, it occurred last week, when someone made a post, discussing ma’at and how she could better live within ma’at, or bring it into their daily life. In this post, she stated that the Shopping Cart Theology was useful for some, but not for her. This then sparked a response post and a host of comments on KIN and Tumblr.

It seems to me that the Kemetic community (if you wish to call it that) is a lot like a fandom. In any given fandom, you tend to have people who believe that the books are better than the movie. You have people who think that you aren’t a true fan unless…

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